Archive for June 2011

FED – Ideas to Sustain

Realpolitik and Bella Caledonia present ‘FED – Ideas Worth Sustaining’, a one-day program of talks, discussions, and, most importantly, ideas. FED takes its cue from July’s TEDGlobal Edinburgh conference – but while TED costs an eye-watering £3,700 to attend, FED… Read More ›

Hari’s Game

by Kevin Williamson Many years ago I was interviewed for a national newspaper by one of its senior journalists.  The interview took place in Glasgow, on a Saturday morning prior to an Old Firm match.  The city centre was teeming… Read More ›

Anger Management

At the beginning of March 2011, Mervyn King, governor of the Bank of England, expressed his surprise to the British Treasury Select Committee (in the ‘Thatcher Room’ of all places), that there had not been more public anger in response to the financial crisis. In this respect, the muted response in Scotland to the crisis is little different to that in the other nations of Britain. But what is at least as surprising is that there has not been more public anger in Scotland at the absence of a Tory mandate to govern Scotland. We are, after all, talking about a government that was rejected by almost 85 per cent of Scottish voters and that won barely 2 per cent of seats in Scotland at the last British general election.

The Road to Nowhere

With the news that everything the protestors at the Pollock Free State – said was true all along we feature Rosie Kane from her new blog: “Tomorrow evening a whole bunch of smiling politicians and dignitaries will stand on the… Read More ›

Greek Crisis and Response

The only way to describe recent developments in Greece is to refer to a peaceful popular insurrection that has led to an open political crisis. The mass gatherings at city squares at the centres of all major Greek cities continue to gather momentum. Since the 25th of May, Athens and most Greek cities have experienced some of the biggest mass rallies in recent history. It is a unique experience of social mobilization. It is also a highly original form of protest, which combines mass rallies with a democratic process of discussion through mass people’s assemblies.

Naming the Movement

The early 21st century is marked by a profusion of initiatives that bring people together to discuss and explore big questions. It amounts to a great river of change – but to realise its potential the movement needs a formal designation, says Keith Kahn-Harris.

Hard Labour

By Doug the Dug I’ve been mulling over why the Labour party has failed in its efforts to stop the rise of the SNP since the Scottish Parliament was instituted in 1999 and oddly enough it’s the articles posted on… Read More ›

Eco Mindshift

This is Natalie Jeremijenko on the art of eco-mindshift, from Pat Kane’s new Radical Animal site. Natalie Jeremijenko is an artist/engineer whose background includes studies in biochemistry, physics, neuroscience and precision engineering. She is an active member of the net.art… Read More ›

Shock of the Century

By Michael Greenwell Brian Taylor of BBC politics fame had a seemingly off-record quote about the startlingly obvious yesterday… Firstly, a UK minister told me, with considerable emphasis, that the government at Westminster was “not neutral” with regard to Scottish… Read More ›

In the World, at the Limits to Growth

“It’s been part of the background noise for over half a century, warnings about resource scarcity, biodiversity loss, soil erosion or climate change. But impacts were always on the imaginative horizon. Sometime, far enough into the future to be re-assuring to a species that evolved with a clear preference for the short-term…”

We Need to Talk About Kevin

It’s difficult to know how to respond to Kevin McKenna’s weekend piece of writing in the Observer ‘If We Buy Taransay We Can Save the Union’ (Sun June 5 2011). It’s certainly a nadir for the Observer / Guardian newspaper and a departure into a form of Uncle Tom journalism for Kevin McKenna.