Social Movement rss

Break Up or Break Out?

Amicable Separation? Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland are not attempting old-style nation-statehood: they are (and indeed, can’t help being) in search of a new mode of distinctive development. Post-globalisation self-rule, liberated from the contortions of imperialism and warfare, and adapted to circumstances in which the scale of statehood is no longer so important…

God versus the Gays

A consultation on the issue of same-sex marriages and religious ceremonies for civil partnerships has been launched by Scottish ministers. The Scottish Government said its initial view was that same-sex marriage should be introduced. Nicola Sturgeon said a recent Scottish… Read More ›

ID Cards

By Mhairi McAlpine Earlier this month , David Tobin critiqued visions of a Post-colonial Scotland, examining the “national identity politics” which are shaping us on our course to independence. This is indeed a key question for us as a nation… Read More ›

For Scottish Democracy

‘Democracy’ is a term that has become tattered and bandied about, it has come to inhabit a similar terrain to words like ‘family’, ‘fairness’, and ‘aspiration’. Democracy in our times has become like a prostitute referred to as a ‘working… Read More ›

Unite?

By Mhairi McAlpine I’ve been involved for several months now with the Coalition of Resistance in Glasgow, an interesting development with a participative format and an activist focus, designed to draw together disparate groups resisting the cuts across Glasgow offering… Read More ›

Anger Management

At the beginning of March 2011, Mervyn King, governor of the Bank of England, expressed his surprise to the British Treasury Select Committee (in the ‘Thatcher Room’ of all places), that there had not been more public anger in response to the financial crisis. In this respect, the muted response in Scotland to the crisis is little different to that in the other nations of Britain. But what is at least as surprising is that there has not been more public anger in Scotland at the absence of a Tory mandate to govern Scotland. We are, after all, talking about a government that was rejected by almost 85 per cent of Scottish voters and that won barely 2 per cent of seats in Scotland at the last British general election.

All is Not Lost

It is important to identify this development in order to juxtapose it to the traditional structures and institutions of power. Similarly if the concept of a Scottish left is to have any meaning it may need to be considered as an emerging fuzzy entity rather than ring-fenced in advance by rigid absolutism or fixed ideology.

The Struggle in Wisconsin

Events are still unfolding in Wisconsin, and may yet escalate further. But we can already draw some conclusions from them, which can guide us in the months ahead–for Wisconsin is surely only the first of many states that will see public outrage over austerity measures.