2007 - 2020

Dangerous Radicalisation

corbyn-arrest-rob-scottThe problem of the radicalisation of young people is getting more desperate, as 1000s of people make the journey to ‘Corbyn’.

One proud New Labour parent, said “These kids don’t know what they’re doing. It’s all done over the internet. One minute they were good unthinking Blairites, the next thing you know they are engaged in democracy and common sense, it’s terrifying. Some of them are beginning to think fr themselves and question things. Before you know it they might have declared a commitment to ‘social justice’.”

The dangerous mastermind behind this new surge of radicalisation is a man known simply as ‘Jeremy’.

But behind his modest unassuming linen jacket and ‘hat’ are ideas that are sent to destroy the very fabric of the Austerity Kingdom. In words that are sure to send a chill down any right-thinking person he bellowed: ““What is there not to like about young people turning up and being interested in politics? What it’s about is converting Labour into much more of a social movement.”

Undercover police have reported that ‘hard left’ activists have infiltrated the mainstream party and are introducing ideas such as ‘thinking for yourself’ and ‘having a clue what’s going on’. Thankfully, political experts such as veteran John McTernan have stepped forward to explain why supporting popular policies such as holding transport and utilities in public ownership and scrapping Trident would be a disaster for Labour, still bouyant in Scotland after his wise counsel saw them obliterated.

Also bringing wise counsel to the debate is former New Statesman firebrand  Jason Cowley, writing in his favoured journal of the Daily Mail, who warns: “Corbyn is opposed to the UK’s independent nuclear deterrent and supports a 7 per cent rise in National Insurance to fund the reintroduction of student grants.”

Bella shudders to think what the combination of public education AND us being denuded of the ability to obliterate other civilizations could do to the Peoples Party’s standing in the eyes of those that matter. This coud get serious. As Mark Steel put it ‘The last thing Labour needs is a leader like Jeremy Corbyn who people want to vote for’. Perpetually anonymous Yvette Cooper added: “The important thing is that we emerge stronger from this and pull together as a united party and we really get serious about winning the next election.”

 

 

 

 

Comments (18)

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  1. Andy Nimmo says:

    OMG. What is the world coming to.
    Social Justice instead of greed
    Integrity instead of incompetence
    This is just far too radical and dangerous
    I think I’ll need to go for a wee lie down in my box

  2. BBC Scotlandshire says:

    We may sue.

  3. scottieDog says:

    Daily mail should form part of the national curriculum. Lol

  4. John Mooney says:

    Superb! I wonder how Mr.”MORON”McTernan’s next cunning plan will work out.lol.

  5. peter russell says:

    spot on. thanks….

  6. Lincoln Powell says:

    “the next thing you know they are engaged in democracy and common sense, it’s terrifying. Some of them are beginning to think fr themselves and question things”.

    Arrogant, self-serving hubris. Just as bad as that 14 year old you had on here calling the 2 million (informed, correct) No voters ‘cowards’. Honestly, who do you think you are to call everyone you don’t agree with undemocratic, lacking common sense, ignorant, stupid and unable to think for themselves.

    Will you ever give people credit for making up their own minds?

    And you wonder why you lost your Referendum? (and will lose it again, and again, and again).

    Before you know it they might have declared a commitment to ‘social justice’.”

    Which is an utterly empty, meaningless expression.

    “introducing ideas such as ‘thinking for yourself’ and ‘having a clue what’s going on’.”

    More vain, arrogant, self-serving hubris.

    “popular policies such as holding transport and utilities in public ownership”

    Yes, these are ‘popular’ and hence ‘populists’ like to play on them.

    Many People – possibly about half – think that putting transport (whether its rail or bus) into public ownership will automatically, seamlessly and swiftly make it cheaper.

    It won’t. At best the cost to the end user will remain about the same and the quality of the service will deteriorate, or the cost will increase and the service will deteriorate.

    That’s not to say there isn’t a role for the state. Here in Greater Manchester, serious consideration is being given to establish competition for the bus market, instead of competition in the bus market, in a form of franchising with elements similar to that found in London. This may be be able to offer a balance between efficiency, reach and commercial viability (and not be “unaffordable” as insisted by Peter A Bell (“Freelance Writer”).

    The situation with Rail is much more complicated. But anyone old enough to remember British Rail will know that the worst thing you could do is take the whole thing back into public ownership.

    (I’d prefer something like the German arrangement with the system operated by a company 51% owned by the state, but there you go).

    “and scrapping Trident ”

    Proportionally, hardly anyone is in favour of scrapping Trident, including in Scotland. It is there for all to see in the social attitudes surveys.

    “and supports a 7 per cent rise in National Insurance to fund the reintroduction of student grants.”

    I’m sure he does. All the social attitudes surveys across the UK, in England, Scotland, Wales and NI show that people believe they are ‘taxed enough’ and do not want to pay more tax. They want OTHER people to pay more tax. “Don’t tax me, tax them!!!”.

    “to fund the reintroduction of student grants.”

    You could start to work back towards this if you cut the numbers of school leavers going on to higher education from +40% back to the 10 – 12% it once was, when people tended to go to proper institutions doing proper degrees that were directly vocational and / or gave you skills and knowledge actually useful in getting a job in the jobs market. And not media studies at Leeds Polytechnic with a couple of low passes at A level.

    I recently bought a suit from a gentleman’s outfitters. Nice young chap served me. Got talking. Conversation turned to his plans for the future, which included never expecting to / having to pay his student debts back. Gentleman’s outfitters; degree? You guessed it, Media Studies. All that money, and time, for nothing. (Well, I’m sure he had a good time …. )

    “Bella shudders to think what the combination of public education AND us being denuded of the ability to obliterate other civilizations could do to the Peoples Party’s standing in the eyes of those that matter. ”

    The Labour Party is finished – north and south of the border. It’s for disgruntled / entitled public sector workers. And claimant cultures. At least the ones that haven’t gone to UKIP.

    1. Alan Stewart says:

      I’d be more than happy to give people credit for making up their own minds, if I thought for one second that they did. An individuals voting decision can be neither correct or incorrect. I also take issue with your use of the term “informed”. A great deal of “information” is inaccurate.
      How’s that Northern Powerhouse coming along ?

      1. Lincoln Powell says:

        “How’s that Northern Powerhouse coming along ?”

        I don’t really go in for soundbites, but in terms of Greater Manchester – it’s going great thanks. Our economy (bigger than that of Wales, or Northern Ireland) continues to grow and diversity. Much more work to be done and challenges to be overcome, but we are forging ahead.

        Come down – see how much development is happening – and much more planned.

        We’ve just finished completing the latest phase of our light rail system, with more to come. How did your Edinburgh Tram work out?

        Or indeed, how is “SCOTLAND’S FUTURE” coming along? (The future where all the spending plans were predicated on oil at £110 a barrel). With oil soon to hit $50 a barrel and falling, and that trend to continue. And an 80% drop in Scottish oil and gas revenues.

        And a lost referendum.

        How’s SCOTLAND’S FUTURE” coming along eh?

        1. Alan Stewart says:

          “Come down” – you’re leaping to conclusions again. I live in the south of England.

        2. Alan Stewart says:

          If you’re just going to ooze spiteful drivel, you’ll just be ignored like an irritating child.

        3. Andy Nimmo says:

          Sometimes it is best to just quote the old sayings.
          ‘ The cost of everything and the value of nothing’
          ‘You can lead a horse to water but you can’t make it drink’
          ‘Empty vessels make the most noise’
          ‘Evil flourishes when good men write absolute mince’

          Manchester may have a powerhouse but it was built by the people who are currently being treated no better than office supplies – to be thrown in the bin when no longer required..
          Wealth creation is fine if actioned with competence.
          The New Religion of the New Monster Raving Labour and Tory Partys is based on the dogma ‘gross incompetence equals gross profits’.

    2. James Coleman says:

      To Lincoln Powell

      Who is this long winded nut case? Unless of course what he’s written is meant to be satire? Gave up after the first 3 paras.

  7. Lincoln Powell says:

    Sorry, i forgot, regarding public ownership of utilities.

    That’s populist nonsense as well.

    The UK still has some of the lowest energy prices in Europe.

    (And now easy mechanisms for comparing prices and legislation that ensures easy switching between suppliers).

    It’s the dramatic rise in the past 10 years or so that has caught people out.

    Taking utilities back into public ownership (or rather, Union ownership) would see prices rocket, and we’d be back to it taking three months to get a phone / internet connection, or to change supplier etc.

    Again, possibly about half of people think that taking utilities back into public ownership would make them and keep them cheaper. These people are idiots.

  8. C Rober says:

    Cracking bit of humour.

    Problem I see with the nationalization of former state owned utils , rail , electric and gas , is that they operate on profit while getting tax payer money. The old argument of back to the bad would not be allowed to happen , ie strikes for pay , lack of investment , pensions , these can and should be adressed first to prevent the doomsayer with a rear view mirror argument.

    Rail is subsidised , stiil taxpayer funded.

    We still have the highest fares in Europe , with privatization , and of course overcrowding , not to forget that we now import most of the rolling stock , thus secondary jobs are gone like in Springburn.

    Electric profits are shared like a monopoly between the big 3 , hardly open market with price fixing.

    HMG or Holyrood , should be locking in their profits to 5 percent , and the rest spent on infrstructure and eco investment – including harnessing energy outwith chemical batteries.

    With a long term goal of taking 1 percent shares over the next 51 years as a super utils tax , their profits over the next 30 years will be exponential with the mini ice age coming. If the EU has a problem feck em , Germany does the same as does France – owning private comany shares – even to the point of council pension pots invested in VW or with France a direct share ownership of nearly all of the car makers and perhaps the trains.

    Of course we keep the unions out of it , removes strikes , by paying a working wage linked to inflation , private pensions instead of civil pensions , and removing statutory overtime , creating more jobs.

    Its better to use what we have learned and profit from it ourselves , than to continue to allow the small few to become richer through our tax payer funding.

    Example , Post office Privatization.

    Made a few really rich , grossly undervalued , share options for the people to buy shares was limited.

    The same was done with the gas , electric , telco , yet no one asked why the taxpayer had to pay for shares if they technically already owned it. Big hedge funds got the lions share and were able to offload instantly for fast profit , the lowly taxpayer individual investor , or worker , was time locked in to prevent resale and aid the profit of the hedge funds.

    Its time to take all the privatized companies back , with a yearly super tax , before they all are owned by EU companies that have protected theirs but are insisting on open markets.

  9. GM says:

    Also bringing wise counsel to the debate is former New Statesman firebrand Jason Cowley, writing in his favoured journal of the Daily Mail, who warns: “Corbyn is opposed to the UK’s independent nuclear deterrent and supports a 7 per cent rise in National Insurance to fund the reintroduction of student grants.”

    The UK does not have an independent nuclear deterrent, it is dependent on the America state.

  10. Gordon McShean says:

    This brings back to me the sense of loneliness that a radicalized Scot can feel. When I became an active, excited radical at age 16, participating in the campaign against recognition of the new queen (QEII), I obtained a temporary delusion of involvement in a brotherhood. However, when forced to escape from my own land subsequent to the coronation (read my memoir RETIRED TERRORIST, 2011), the solitary nature of exile became increasingly and painfully apparent. This was not due to any sense of personal inadequacy, but because of observation from afar of the nation’s impotence, demonstrated by such subjects as Trident and the recent referendum. From the other side of the world I leaf through my dear collection of Scottish memorabilia and wonder what to do with it all. The Bellacaledonia communications seem to indicate that some day my Scottish brothers will succeed in establishing a social and political structure validating the concepts that a few lonely idealists have clung to – not just for my lifetime, but over many arduous centuries.

  11. Connor McEwen says:

    Is Lincoln Powell any relation to Enoch Powell

    1. bigal says:

      They share more than a surname.

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