2007 - 2020

How has the Brexit vote altered your view of Britain? #EU2

In the next of our series asking European citizens living in Scotland about their response to Brexit, Emanuele de Vito writes…

My idea of Britain before the Brexit vote was of a profoundly divided place, with different cultures and attitudes existing on either sides of the border. The Brexit vote hasn’t changed that. In fact, it has highlighted the difference of attitudes existing between Scotland and England on the issue of immigration, which was the most important issue for many voters . I am not going to say that the English (or anyone who voted Leave) are racists, because I think the responsibility lies with some politicians and the media, who normalised xenophobic ideas for decades. There is also the issue of jobs, pay and housing to be taken into account. Many industrial cities lost a lot since the years of Thatcherism. Industries shut down and people had to take up less-paid and less-secure jobs, in retail or hospitality for instance. Rents have been going up and the same time a lot of people came in. Furthermore, many politicians and newspapers blamed all this on migrants. You see why people ended up believing in that narrative and feel that migrants have been stealing their jobs or houses. Migrants have been blamed for the shortcomings of three decades of Neoliberal, Thatcherite policies.

In Scotland, things have been remarkably better. Leading politicians never used that divisive narrative, and I like to think that the Remain vote we saw here wasn’t a consequence of enthusiasm for the EU but rather a rejection of the disgustingly divisive narrative we saw coming from down South. This doesn’t mean that racism does not exist up here, but it is surely not legitimised by the institutions and it is more limited.


How has the Brexit vote altered your view of Scottish independence?

I voted Yes in 2014 and I would vote for Independence again. However, many on the Yes camp are making a mistake in trying to link the issue of independence to that of the EU. What persuaded many people to vote Yes in 2014 was the radical message of change that shaped the Yes campaign, and we need to make that message stronger (for instance, on the issue of currency and jobs). To simply assume that anyone who voted Remain would vote for Independence is wrong, for the reasons I outlined above. Also, I feel this time the SNP’s central message in case of a new referendum would be that of continuity with the status-quo, as opposed to that of change. This may alienate previously Yes supporters and it needs challenged.

What are your fears of what will happen as a result of Brexit?

My fears were that the Brexit vote would translate into a triumph of the xenophobic Little Englander narrative. This has turned out to be true, see for instance the Home Secretary’s speech the other day. Nevertheless, I am happy that Brexit brought the issue of Independence to the fore again. Although the EU won’t win us another referendum, it is increasingly clear that we cannot rely on Westminster to take decisions that reflect the democratic will of people living here.

Would you support Scotland to remain a member of the EU?

I would. However, I am a Socialist and I ultimately believe that the EU is a neoliberal institution that puts the interest of big business first. There are risks related to retaining the EU membership. Namely, the EU may expect Scotland to carry out austerity programmes or undercut wages to retain competitiveness. I believe in a radical, independent Scotland and that would be achieved best outside of the EU.

What are the consequences for you, your friends and family?

I have lived in Scotland for 5 years and I feel Scottish just as much as I feel Italian. This is my home and I have never felt unwelcome here, that’s why I am planning on living in Scotland for the foreseeable future. For all these reasons, I am struggling to come to terms with the reality: my right to stay here is at risk.

At the moment there are no consequences, we will need to find out what Brexit actually means. What I know for sure is that many of my friends from other EU countries are making alternative plans in case they can’t stay anymore.index

Comments (26)

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  1. Valerie says:

    Good piece. The only thing I would question, is why you think the EU would try and force an austerity programme on Scotland?
    This isn’t something the SG would buy into in any case, and reducing wages is a race to the bottom, it’s not improving competitiveness.

    1. Thrawn says:

      They would force it for the same reasons they forced it on Greece, Portugal, Ireland, Spain, Italy and any other European country facing large deficits…because the German taxpayer will not accept to pay for the “profligacy” (I use the scare quotes to denote that is their opinion…not necessarily mine in all of the above cases) of others.

      The Scottish Government if it wanted to be in Europe would have to abide by this fact especially if as is 95% sure the entry condition for Scotland will be to take the Euro

      1. Emanuele de Vito says:

        Thrawn, I am not entirely sure of the need of adopting the Euro as a requirement for retaining/obtaining the EU membership. We are entering uncharted waters when it comes to the Brexit process and I personally would not rule out a scenario in which Scotland was granted some ‘favours’ just as a retort for rUK (which the EU wants to see failing, I am sure we all agree on this). One of these favours could be offering to Scotland to opt out from the Euro. This is all guesswork anyway cause the UK will be the first country to ever trigger article 50 and we can’t look at how the EU behaved in the past on a similar issue.

        I agree with you on the first part of your comment (which answers Valerie’s question). Improving competitiveness and cutting wages is not necessarily the same thing, however countries such as Greece and Spain have been imposed by the IMF, ECB and EC cuts in the real value of wages of over 20% in the name of competitiveness. In case of another banking crisis (which at the present looks likely) more austerity could be imposed and again it would be normal citizens to pay for it.

      2. Charles says:

        The Euro is not a condition of entry to worry over as the conditions to join include the voluntary entry to ERM. So don’t join ERM and euro is out of the equation.

      3. c rober says:

        Thrawn.

        Greece is quite different from the other mentioned , well apart from perhaps Portugal. Theres more to it than just the MSM reporting , as Scotland itself knows.

        Greece had their books cooked to gain entry , and perceived that the EU would fund its increasing pensions and welfare bills , holidays , and inflated civil service wages , all promises from their politicians that had to be paid for afterwards by tax collection…. but could not , as tax avoidance is an olympic level discipline in Greece. As a result it is not the EU that are the problem for Greece , but local politicians , the people themselves , and unchecked credit from banks.Historically it has always been that way , long before the EU they had defaulted on national debt many times , much like Italy.

        Portugal may also have cooked the books , but their problem is that of Lisboas wealthy elite psuedo socialist politicians , and endemic corruption see ex president case , but instead using the EU as a blamehound – sound familiar? It should do they have been blaming England since the 18th century too for some perhaps unfair treaties , a bit like Spain and GIb really.

        Ireland , though had a IMF bailout , chose not to go the same route as the others , ie UK , Greece and decided to avoid austerity to pay for bank failure. And as a result are now the stable ground of all of the ones mentioned. Showing perhaps that choosing austerity is a lie , or simply does not work , so in letting some banks fail and selling off assets to the highest bidder , or bulldozing instead worked… but many govts are afraid to do so , and instead allow banks to hold depreciating assets as inflated ones – to base their company value on.

        Spain has chosen to base its return on exports , from cars made for its Germany owners via seat , or fruit and veg – some say illegally tapping the aquifirs. Its youth unemployment rate high , yet less than you would think wish to leave for work , unlike that of Portugal , Ireland and Italy.Though unlike Ireland its banks are still holding inflated unsalable housing in various states of completion , without any interest from buyers , instead they should perhaps go the Irish dozer route to reduce supply.But there in lies the overall problem for Spain , its national pride.

        Italy like Greece has a history of loan default , and with its generational move from hill framing to industrial farming , powered by machinery not jobs is where it is being impacted , and of course this will worsen with the unsustainable birth rate affecting future taxes and importantly pensions.

        I keep my eye on housing markets in Europe , have investments in businesses in these markets , as well as personal property , so I do have my finger on the pulse as a result.I also read local papers and are in contact with Estate agents that are personal friends , they give me the real picture , if they own the business themselves.

        3 years ago a bungalow in Irish countryside was typically offered for sale from 35k in euros or less from new and old , since then this has more than doubled. Spanish property is still cheap , but also still inflated due to banks being bailed out , not having to cash out. Instead Spainish banks offer 100 percent mortgages trying to sell to tourists as investments , but as we now know brexit will impact this heavily , and may even see the increase of properties for sale as a result of returners – more so with the GIB and NHS funding demands of Madrids politico.

        Just last year the pound euro rate of 1.40 to the quid made purchasing Irish/Spanish property cheaper than buying a static caravan in most of the UK.

        Today though the exchange rate being lower means exports are in demand from the UK , but imports from the EU/China/USA will suffer as a result , however the countries you mention being part of the Euro mechanism have no such ability to work the value of the local currency in such a way – this is the biggest failure of the EU , as not all countries are created equal , ie heavy industry unlike Germany , so without the adjustment lever suffer from it , and export wealth directly to Germany – the biggest gainer in the Euro itself – as a result of historical exchange rates disappearing.

  2. Adam says:

    We may be required to take on the Euro but this will not happen for at least 10 years after joining.

  3. Crubag says:

    The Stability and Growth pact (sic) caps national deficits at 3% of GDP.

    http://ec.europa.eu/economy_finance/economic_governance/sgp/index_en.htm

    It applies to all member states, but its enforcement is somewhat flexible.. basically are you big or small. Euro countries can be hit worse but there are also potential claw-backs for non-euro countries.

  4. schweppeslimone says:

    “My idea of Britain before the Brexit vote was of a profoundly divided place, with different cultures and attitudes existing on either sides of the border”.

    As a Scot that has lived a fraction less than half of his life, I can assure any readers that this is utter garbage, and there is no evidence for this assertion whatsoever.

    The only fundamental difference ‘culturally’ or in terms of ‘attitudes’ is that Scots are more keen on tax and spend (and why not, when the communal rUK pot is picking up the bill, to which Scotland is currently a net beneficiary of £16bn per year).

    I have lived for many years in Scotland and in England, so clearly I am well placed to provide a view on this; more so than the author, who presumably has only lived in Scotland.

    This is just another virtue signalling propaganda puff piece, no doubt paid for out of the editors crowdfunding pot.

    “it has highlighted the difference of attitudes existing between Scotland and England on the issue of immigration, which was the most important issue for many voters”

    I will not take lectures on immigration from anyone living in the part of the UK with the lowest population density, with the largest amount of open space, that has experienced a fraction of the immigration that other parts of the UK have.

    Seeking to control immigration into densely populated nation-state overseen by ‘Westminster’ and ‘a Tory Government’ that has has experienced high level of immigration over an extended period of time:

    Totally unacceptable.

    Seeking to control immigration (2014 White Paper for independent Scotland proposed ‘points system’) by smaller part of nation-state with aspirations of ‘independence’ that has much lower population density and has experienced a tiny fraction of the above level of immigration over the same period of time, for Scottish Scottisher Scottishy Scottishness sake:

    Absolutely fine.

    SEPARATIST BULLSHIT HYPOCRISY.

    ” I am not going to say that the English (or anyone who voted Leave) are racists”

    That’s very big of you.

    “newspapers blamed all this on migrants. You see why people ended up believing in that narrative and feel that migrants have been stealing their jobs or houses.”

    Those weak minded thickies! Almost – or more – weak minded than all those who voted No in the 2014 Scottish independence referendum. All INCAPABLE of making up their own minds. How fortunate they are to have someone as wise as you to show they how wrong they are, and someone as upstanding and right-thinking as you to show them the error of their ways!

    There are of course, NO legitimate concerns about immigration. We must let anyone in, and there must be no limit on the numbers. Anyone who disagrees with this is a Racist.

    “Migrants have been blamed for the shortcomings of three decades of Neoliberal, Thatcherite policies.”

    Well, if you say it that way it must be the UNASSAILABLE TRUTH and an UNCHALLENGEABLE FACT.

    Blamed by whom? Oh yes, those thickies you mentioned earlier who are incapable of making up their own minds, and who’s complaints are entirely down to Racism.

    “In Scotland, things have been remarkably better.”

    Where there has been a TINY FRACTION of the immigration experienced in other parts of the country – or within other parts of the country.

    Immigration is not a linear function, it affects people and places across space differently. Scotland has had all the advantages of a liberal economic (and immigration policy) and none of the disbenefits. e.g. my brother in Dumfries thinks immigration is wonderful, because immigration to him is his nice Polish dentist.

    “I like to think that the Remain vote we saw here wasn’t a consequence of enthusiasm for the EU but rather a rejection of the disgustingly divisive narrative we saw coming from down South.”

    On your first point, on this occasion, correct – the lower turnout in Scotland shows how complacent Scotland was about the EU referendum. On the second; what and where is ‘down south’? In my city, Manchester, we voted to remain on a not dissimilar level to Scotland?

    Does that make me and my city ‘down south’, spouting a disgusting divisive narrative’.

    More ‘us superior / them inferior’ nasty divisive bullshit from a Separatist.

    “This doesn’t mean that racism does not exist up here, but it is surely not legitimised by the institutions and it is more limited.”

    Yes, instead, you are the home of Sectarian Bigotry. Is that better?

    “xenophobic Little Englander narrative.”

    Or, any concern about the non-linear impact of immigration is Racist, and is to be shouted down by smug, self-serving, self-righteous cretins like you.

    “Although the EU won’t win us another referendum, it is increasingly clear that we cannot rely on Westminster to take decisions that reflect the democratic will of people living here.”

    Fuck Off then. Why do you need someone’s permission to become independent. Why not just declare yourselves independent? Declare UDI. I want you to. When are you going to get your shit together and LEAVE? To scared? or too incompetent? Go on. Declare UDI. (Beer and Popcorn ready).

    “I am a Socialist”

    Oh, you’re one of those.

    “I believe that the EU is a neoliberal institution that puts the interest of big business first”

    WOW, a rare lucid moment. The purpose of the EU is to serve the needs of Capital, yes. (You either accept it or you don’t … I accept it instead of the awful alternative, the vile Socialism, a system that without exception has brought misery to entire populations and been a complete disaster everywhere it has been tried).

    “I have lived in Scotland for 5 years and I feel Scottish just as much as I feel Italian.”

    That’s lovely. Why did you leave your precious Italy? is it because it is so corrupt? (far more corrupt than than the UK, which is relatively uncorrupt in a global sense).

    Why not sort out things in your own country? Oh, because you wanted to come to the nice UK, and enjoy our nice economy, nice safety net, nice education and health service, and nice things generally, while your economy hasn’t grown for more than a decade.

    Not very ‘socialist internationalist’ of you is it? You jumped ship and bailed out of your own country, didn’t you? How sad.

    “I am planning on living in Scotland for the foreseeable future”

    I bet you are. A place where even when the tax receipts are £16bn down on what the cost to serve, Mummy makes up the difference for you. Lots of space, an economy that performs reasonably well from being part of the UK, and low immigration, with little pressure on local services. What’s not to like?

    “What I know for sure is that many of my friends from other EU countries are making alternative plans in case they can’t stay anymore.”

    On and on with this bullshit hyperbole. Anyone who is here already will be staying. Why would the UK government want a mass exodus of labour? We need to do something about the millions of people born in the UK who refuse to work and / or are unemployable for sure. But we don’t want a mass exodus. I’d much rather be served my burrito on a Friday night by a smiling, charming eastern european (who wants to work) rather than some scowling spotty type from down the road.

    I hope you’re working by the way, in a proper job – and not sponging off the State, which of course is paid for by the rest of us in the UK.

    1. punklin says:

      Troll alert or just a profusion of cliches with little thought, analysis, evidence and no understanding of the myriad aspects of the independence movement?

      L’union est morte – vive l’independance!

    2. kailyard rules says:

      Way too much “bitter” lemon in your schweppes yoonsundowner.

    3. Emanuele de Vito says:

      I strongly believe different attitudes exist on either sides of the border. You live in Manchester. I lived in Sussex. This may explain why we have different opinions. Sussex is an admittedly wealthy part of the country and I always lived in working class areas here in Scotland (Leith in Edinburgh and Govanhill in Glasgow). I couldn’t help noticing that in Scotland there is a stronger sense of community, and people as you correctly say agree to having higher social spending. In Scotland there is much higher political engagement (that’s possibly a consequence of the IndyRef but as you know Scotland has a more radical tradition than the rest of the UK). People have radically different opinion on politics and on a wide variety of social issues, perhaps I can show you a map of the voting pattern in Sussex but I am sure you are aware of what I talking about (there is actually something in common between Sussex and Scotland: both only have 1 Labour MP, the difference being that almost all the rest of MPs are Tories in Sussex, and SNP in Scotland- or Labour until very recently). This is a historical trend and is a consequence of certain ideas being more popular in particular areas of the country. This is also reflected in the whole South-East, which for instance elects more MPs than the whole of Scotland.

      Immigration- I personally live in an area of the country with level of immigration higher than the UK average. Edinburgh’s foreign born population was 16.3% in 2011 (75,696 out of a total population of 464,990) compared to 13.1% UK-wide in 2014. There are no figures on Leith (where I currently live) but my guess is that it’s even higher here. Clearly you dislike being around people who are different from you (loony socialists, bloody migrants, benefit scrounging bastards). Fortunately I have never come across someone like you in my 5 years in Scotland, despite living in an area which, according to your own idea of what’s to like and what not to like, has a kind of plague and should trigger racist feelings.

      I am not referring to UDI. I simply highlighted how the issue of the EU won’t be the one that will shift opinions substantially towards independence (as confirmed by the polls- can we believe the polls tho? Genuine question).

      Concerns on immigration are indeed genuine and rooted in what are ultimately working class problems (lack of decent housing and decent jobs as I highlighted). I never suggested otherwise. My point was rather that no-one on the left had the guts to explain that this is due to the neoliberal restructuring of the economy. The fact the bosses of big manufacturing or even service companies prefer to give jobs to people living in India so they can be paid 1/10 of what they would be paid in the UK is a problem no-one addresses. Clearly it is simpler to blame migrants for stealing jobs that don’t exist anymore, as opposed to tackle big business and prevent them from relocating somewhere else. Well done for doing that.

      Housing: in Edinburgh pretty much ALL NEW CONSTRUCTION SITES are for luxury hotels or expensive student pads. Why aren’t money invested to build affordable homes for locals? In your world where migrants are to be blamed for everything, it is clearly their fault that no homes are being built(I suppose mine as well). I believe in more State intervention in the economy is necessary and this will not come from Westminster.

      You disagree with my explanation, that blames 30 years of failed Thatcherite policies, yet you don’t put forward any alternative explanation. Unless you REALLY think that all problems of society are to be blamed on migrants, who are the weakest socio-economic group in Britain, in which case I am not sure why I am wasting my time on here.

      Finally, you think that foreigners are only good to serve your burrito and they shouldn’t dare voicing opinions in the country that they have decided to make their home. This is borderline racism and doesn’t really deserve to be responded. Just, please let me know, am I only entitled to an opinion if I have a job? I am actually starting a new job on Monday, and this week I am claiming JSA (this is paid by my NI payments). Two weeks ago I had another job, was I entitled to an opinion then? I am curious to hear what you think.

      I just had a brilliant idea, every foreign-born JSA claimant should be given some sellotape to tape their mouth. Just in case they dare voicing their opinion about a country that is giving them £70 a week. And all their comments online should be cancelled or made invisible until they get a new job! What a brilliant idea, I am going to phone Amber Rudd and tell her! Or maybe you should?

      1. bringiton says:

        Seems that over consumption of Schweppes has a similar effect to Irn Bru…..brain damage….just ask Murphy.
        Scottish culture,as shared with our northern neighbours has a much greater sense of community and communal responsibilities than many south of our border.
        We do believe that there is such a thing as society and have consistently rejected the voodoo economic philosophy and policies emanating from London.
        They (England’s Tories) are about to find out what a tough world it is without friends and good neighbours.

      2. Ther says:

        Some of the points you make are valid but it is depressing to read you falling back on the cliches of the left; ‘neo liberal restructuring of the economy’ and ’30 years of failed Thatcherism.’
        There are so many immigrants in the UK as a whole and in certain areas in particular, such as Leith, because the economy is doing well.
        Many of those have arrived from countries where their own government has, in comparison, failed. Spain and Italy come to mind. These countries export their unemployed young. In Edinburgh the losers are the young in areas such as West Pilton and Wester Hailes.
        I understand why unemployed people from mainland Europe come here but I wish they would be honest and admit that they are here because their own – often corrupt – governments have failed.
        (Poland is a slightly different case since it was, de facto, an occupied country for 2/3 of the last 75 years.)

  5. Alf Baird says:

    “currency and jobs” was less an issue than people think. Culture was the main decision making factor in my view. Voters either felt more British or more Scottish. This has a lot to do with the cultural cringe and particularly the absence of teaching of the Scots language to Scots bairns. The SNP leadership doesn’t have the brains to figure this out.

    1. schweppeslimone says:

      “currency and jobs” was less an issue than people think. Culture was the main decision making factor in my view. ”

      Christ Almighty.

      All the evidence points to currency, jobs, ‘the economy’, certainty and stability being a key issue for No voters.

      The more affluent you were, the more likely to vote No you were, and vice versa. This is because people who have something to lose, that they may have worked very hard to build up, don’t gamble it lightly.

      In fairness, plenty of those people ’emotionally’ or ‘spiritually’ may well have liked the idea of Independence. The SNP failed to put a sufficiently convincing practical case across (the white paper was utter bullshit, actually)

      “and particularly the absence of teaching of the Scots language to Scots bairns. The SNP leadership doesn’t have the brains to figure this out.”

      Zoom. Full Zoom.

      What a glazed-eyed Moonie.

      Nutcase.

      1. Alf Baird says:

        To most No voters it would not matter if Scotland were the richest nation on earth, they are still culturally programmed to vote No. Even when we had the oil wealth peaks, and were potentially as wealthy as Switzerland and Norway, independence was consistently rejected. However as we have become relatively poorer as a nation, the Yes/No gap has been closing, so this is not just about money. Cultural and behavioural aspects are the key – that is why the unionists control of the msm and cultural institutions is maintained.

  6. Caroline Innes says:

    “The Brexit vote hasn’t changed that. In fact, it has highlighted the difference of attitudes existing between Scotland and England on the issue of immigration, which was the most important issue for many voters . I am not going to say that the English (or anyone who voted Leave) are racists, because I think the responsibility lies with some politicians and the media, who normalised xenophobic ideas for decades.” Very sad to say this is very accurate – the failure of the Labour party to speak out with a single voice at the last election and in the referendum helped create this atmosphere where even previously sensible politicians such as Amber Rudd can find themselves making proposals to name and shame companies who hire foreign employers. We need to be sure that Scotland will continue to shine as a beacon of tolerance and that our example will give support to our friends in England and elsewhere who need to row back against this onslaught of prejudice. (And I wont mention the despicable antics of UKIP….)

    1. schweppeslimone says:

      “We need to be sure that Scotland will continue to shine as a beacon of tolerance and that our example will give support to our friends in England and elsewhere who need to row back against this onslaught of prejudice. (And I wont mention the despicable antics of UKIP….)”

      You can fuck right off, virtue signaller.

      Yougov recently did a UK survey on ‘making companies report how many foreign workers they employ’ –
      Support: 59%
      Oppose: 26%

      What do you think the SNP voter split is on this issue?

      50/50. Right down the middle.

      https://yougov.co.uk/news/2016/10/06/public-backs-plans-make-companies-say-how-many-for/

      So much for your egalitarian civic progressive Utopia!

      Fuck Off with your Virtue Signalling. Fuck Right Off.

      I’m Scottish btw, before you fucking start.

      “Beacon of Tolerance”. Lie that Silly Fat Wanker’s “Beacon of Hope” – ? You are a fawning, sycophantic Salmond Fangirl.

      LYING BULLSHITTING HYPOCRITICAL SEPARATIST.

      1. kailyard rules says:

        Go easy on those “bitter” lemon yoonsundowners.

      2. I think you’d better go somewhere else with this and try and calm down. It’s not okay to come here and abuse people. Goodbye!

        1. Richard anderson says:

          It’s worth pointing out that the ‘poll’ that our friend, like many other unionists on social media, was celebrating was a questionnaire that appeared onthe Yougov website. There was no possibility in this ‘poll’ to reject the premise of businesses making lists of foreign employees the options only representing positions that accepted the premise. It wouldn’t be the first time that Yougov was used as a political bludgeon and it won’t be the last.

  7. c rober says:

    Funny all this talk of companies declaring nationality of their employees has created such a stir , surprising no , funny now I think about it not so much – given the rear view mirror of history.

    I am in agreement though , but can I offer this , not just the idea of men in uniforms asking for “papers”.

    What will change it for me , and should do also for the SNP party policy , whom are all anti English racists we hear , is that in that they should submit and not discharge this , and add to the list English , Welsh and N.Irish , as well as their positions within the company in Scotland itself … those bean counters love their data.

    I reckon it would show some interesting data , over and above the census data which goes a long way to prove some of what is hinted about Indy voting in the areas of highest rejection , ie affluence and lower unemployment compared to local Scots , but census doesnt show company positions.

    Therefore the SNP , and its voters , would have CONCRETE ammunition on how Scotland is or is not controlled externally from England … silencing the question once and for all. Westminster is setting a precedent here , so why not use it against them …. its not like immigration will ever be a devolved power…. but in this case it T.MAY well backfire.

    1. Alf Baird says:

      “I reckon it would show some interesting data ”

      A useful example might be that 17 of Scotland’s 19 universities are led by folk from ruk. The usual recruitment practice here is that all high level appointments to the public and private sector in Scotland are advertised in London/UK wide. Given the large population difference between Scotland and ruk, this implies that there is a very significant probability that someone from ruk will be appointed to any senior post here – as we see with the uni’s this is the reality. Some senior posts in Scotland tend to be ‘reserved’ for the private school/elite uni ‘locals’, yet the rather obvious conclusion is that ‘institutional Scotland’ is led and controlled by a mostly unionist administrative elite who will have very little interest in Scottish nationhood, indeed quite the opposite, irrespective of who sits in Holyrood. Perhaps such features broadly describe a colony?

      1. c rober says:

        Bang on I would say , colony is about right.

        Much is said that the pensioner vote cost the indy ref , however I went over the maths , even without the joke that was the economic argument and project fear , those areas with affluence will always be towards maintaining the colony , from big business and media to well paid jobs in official capacity … well that was the case until the downward spiral of NSO , or the threat of remvoign trident etc , where those that can leave , lets call them economic parasitic migrants to use their favorite papers headlines for a moment – only move on to where there is work once more , perhaps for services rendered.

  8. Yan says:

    Doubt there are different attitudes to immigration between England and Scotland, what I would say that is different is the liberty to discuss immigration issues in Scotland without being shot down by an accusation of xenophobia. The intensity of propaganda supporting multiculturalism that Scots are exposed to makes it almost impossible to have a meaningful debate.

    Emanuele de Vito’s experience of Leith culture is transient, a culture in flux from indigenous to multicultural a shift that will make the culture of Leith indistinguishable from any other multicultural urban area in the rest of the UK.

    In the current year identifying Mount Vesuvius as Arthur’s Seat, Emanuele de Vito’s experience of Leith culture was equivalent to that of a intoxicated Scottish tourist walking in the abandoned ruins of pompeii believing that the xeno tourists are the indigenous communitie.

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